Common Workers’ Compensation Definitions

Posted on Thursday, January 30th, 2020 at 12:39 pm    

Here’s a list of many of the worker’s compensation terms used in North Carolina and Virginia work Injury cases. The definitions may vary Depending on the state and the Issues at Hand.

  • Accommodation. This is something to be wary of. When an employee has been released to light duty and the employer “accommodates” the employee’s light duty restrictions imposed by his or her doctor, the employee’s radar should be up. Accommodation is often a pathway to the light duty getting fired for cause for some trumped up minor infraction. While one cannot refuse a reasonable accommodation, injured workers returning to “made up” jobs at their workplace should be very careful how they behave when returning to work. 
  • Adjuster. The agent for the insurance carrier who reviews your claim and negotiates settlements. Employees should let an experienced workers’ compensation lawyer negotiate their work injury claim with the adjuster. 
  • Authorized treating physician. (ATP) The doctor who is the primary healthcare provider for the injured worker and has been authorized by the workers compensation insurance company to treat the injured worker. 
  • Carrier. The insurance company that pays and administers the workers’ compensation claim on behalf of the employer for the benefit of the employee.
  • Claimant. In Virginia, the employee who was hurt or suffered an occupational illness and is requesting medical and wage benefits. 
  • CMS. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. They usually need to be consulted and the Medicare Set Aside must be approved by them if the employee and employer are going to enter into a settlement if the claimant is on Medicare or is likely to be on Medicare soon.
  • Compensable. This means that the worker was an employee and that his/her injuries were due to workplace employment. Workers need to show their claim has merit, is compensable, before any medical bills or wage losses will be paid.
  • Contested claim. This is when the employer denies liability for some reason such as that the worker is not an employee, the injuries were not due to work, or for some other reason.
  • Date of injury. This is the date the workplace accident occurred. Employees generally must notify their employer on the date the workplace accident occurred that they have suffered an injury. Any questions of law are based on the date of injury.
  • First report of injury. This is a form that the employee completes and submits to the state workers’ compensation commission notifying the commission that a worker was injured. A first report of injury is not the same as a legal claim. Employees should not assume that their claim will be proceed if an injury report is filed – even if the carrier makes payment. Employees need to file a proper legal claim with the help of an experienced workers’ compensation lawyer
  • Functional capacity exam (FCE). A test that examines a worker’s physical abilities to perform certain tasks – to assess the type of work the employee can and can’t do. A separate portion of the test may also assist the authorized treating physician in providing a permanent  impairment rating for any injured body parts such as the extremities. 
  • Impairment rating. After a worker reaches the point of maximum medical improvement, he/she should be examined to determine whether he/she has a partial or permanent impairment in particular body parts that are capable of being rated via the FCE and the authorized treating physician’s opinion. In Virginia this typically includes the extremities but excludes the back and neck. In North Carolina, the back and neck are ratable. 
  • Indemnity. Refers to the portion of workers comp benefits that constitute the weekly checks paid by the workers compensation carrier to the injured worker while he or she is physically unable to work, or must work at reduced capacity in a lower-paying job due to his or her injuries.  
  • Independent Medical Exam (IME). Essentially this is a second opinion usually ordered by the defense, to determine whether the treating physician’s assessment of the employee’s health and ability to return to work are accurate, or if any recommended treatment such as surgery is appropriate. In Virginia, an employee can go to his or her doctor of choice for a second opinion provided he or she pays for it; however, there is no formal procedure available in Virginia to obtain a second opinion or IME.  Virginia. In North Carolina, there is, in fact, such a procedure in place. In North Carolina an IME can be obtained at the workers compensation insurance company’s expense. The IME can be used by the employee to help show that that the employee should be entitled to additional treatment or that he or she is incapable of returning to work. 
  • Light duty. Many workers can’t return to their old job because their doctor places physical limitations on what they can do – such as that the worker shouldn’t lift more than 20 pounds during work. Light duty is less strenuous work. The worker may do light duty work as a transition while he/she is healing to their old type of work. Light duty may ultimately be the only type of work an employee can do due to his/her injuries. 
  • Marketing Your Residual Capacity to Work. If you are not under a current, ongoing Award in a Virginia Case, and if you have been put on light duty by your treating physician, then you need to do this, which is looking for work after light duty. Also, pretty much any North Carolina injured worker should look for work if he or she has been placed on light duty. If you are unable to find work within your restrictions, then this is one of the methods by which you may prove that you are entitled to ongoing temporary total disability benefits. 
  • Misclassification. Often, employers will try to classify a worker as an independent contractor so that the worker won’t be eligible for workers’ compensation benefits. A misclassification occurs when the independent contractor should be classified as an employee and thus is eligible for work injury benefits.
  • Maximum medical improvement (MMI). This is the stage when the treating physician determines that additional medical treatment won’t improve the employee’s health. It does not mean medical treatments should end since many workers need health treatments such as physical therapy to ensure their health doesn’t worsen. After an employee reaches MMI, he/she can be assessed for a partial or permanent disability. Workers generally should not consider settling their case until their health has reached the MMI state.
  • Medicare Set Aside. (MSA)This is a set of figures used to cover the cost of future medical expenses factoring in the amount that Medicare will pay for the worker’s medical bills due to his/her eligibility for Medicare. If the injured worker currently qualifies for Medicare, it is a necessary part of the settlement to have any such amounts approved by Medicare first. Even if the injured worker is not currently eligible, if there is any anticipation of application to Social Security Disability, then it would be wise for the injured worker to set aside monies in a separately maintained account to cover work-related injury treatment as part of any settlement. 
  • Nurse case manager. (NCM) A health professions hired by the employer to, in theory, helps the employee manage and keep his/her appointments. Often, the employer is mainly interested in having the nurse case manager find a reason to encourage the treating physician to return the employee back to full duty, thereby terminating benefits. Some unscrupulous NCM’s will also pull dirty tricks like giving last minute notifications of appointments, or sending letters that will not arrive in time regarding appointments so a case may be made for noncompliance with treatment requirements—another path to termination of benefits. 
  • Permanent and total disability.  If found, this will entitle the injured worker not only to the maximum of 500 weeks, but lifetime weekly compensation benefits beyond the 500 weeks due to complete and total loss of any capacity to work. In Virginia and North Carolina, it is defined by a set of very specific injuries in order to be qualified for permanent and total disability. Typically one may not apply for permanent and total disability until the injured worker approaches the end of the 500 week maximum of his or her receipt of benefits. 
  • Permanent partial disability or impairment (PPD or PPI). This is the assessment of how severe workers’ injuries are after he/she has reached MMI and what statutory work loss benefits should be paid. Usually expressed as a rating. 
  • Temporary Partial Disability. (TPD) An injured worker would be entitled to TPD if he or she has physical restrictions due to the work injury, and is able to return to work at a lower-paying job then the pre-injury job. In such case, the injured worker is entitled to 2/3rds of the difference between the pre-injury and light job wage. 
  • Temporary total disability (TTD). This is essentially the period when the worker is unable to work in any capacity and is receiving medical care and weekly checks from the workers compensation insurance company.  While a worker is on temporary total disability, he/she usually receives 2/3rds of his/her lost wages up to a statutory caps/limits of 500 weeks. This type of disability is classified as a temporary total disability (TTD) if the worker can’t do any work; however, in Virginia, an injured worker under an ongoing Award who is on light duty and is not being accommodated by the employer would also be entitled to TTD. Usually the same holds true in North Carolina under an accepted claim; however, a light duty employee should always be marketing his or her residual capacity to some extent in North Carolina, even on an accepted claim. 
  • Settlement. Also known as a full and final settlement sometimes referred to as a “clincher” in North Carolina. A resolution of the employee’s overall claim usually occurs only after the worker has reached the MMI stage. Typically, the worker will receive a lump-sum payment to cover future medical bills and any future indemnity benefits that the worker would likely be entitled to if the claim was not settled. Adjustments may be made to the total amount due to reflect that the worker is getting the funds now and should be able to earn interest on the settlement amount.  (Present Value). 

The main thing to remember insofar as settlements in workers compensation are concerned is that all settlements are voluntary on the part of the workers compensation insurance company. Unlike Court cases, where a verdict can be obtained, in most cases, if the workers compensation insurance company does not want to settle, then they do not have to settle. If the carrier is paying what it has been Ordered to pay by the Commission, then that is all it is required to do. A skilled workers compensation lawyer can often help employees get the best settlement for their types of injuries and medical situation, but there are never any guarantees. Any attorney who says he or she can guarantee a settlement is lying. 

North Carolina and Virginia work injury attorney Joe Miller Esq. understands the legal issues, understands how to negotiate with insurance companies, and understands how to review your medical conditions. He’s been a strong advocate for injured employees for more than 30 years. He’ll help you file and pursue your workers’ compensation claim. To schedule an appointment with attorney Joe Miller, call 888-667-8295. or fill out our online contact form