Scaffolding Injuries and Workers’ Compensation

Posted on Wednesday, May 8th, 2019 at 4:50 pm    

Families of anyone killed due to a workplace scaffolding accident are entitled to death benefits. Survivors of scaffolding falls are entitled to full medical care and wage loss benefits, otherwise known as temporary total disability checks.

Scaffolding is a necessary requirement at many types of construction sites. Scaffolding is generally temporary. Stable scaffolding helps workers rise above the ground to do their job. Unstable scaffolding can easily cause death. Falls from scaffolding can also cause many types of injuries that leave the worker permanently disabled – such as spinal cord injuries which leave a worker partially or completely paralyzed. In the best of cases, workers with spinal cord injuries often live with chronic pain.

If a worker falls on his/her head, the worker can suffer a traumatic brain injury which affects the workers physical, emotional, and cognitive abilities. Workers with a severe brain injury often never return to work. Even workers with mild traumatic brain injury need to treat with neurosurgeons, neurologists, their family doctors, speech pathologists, physical therapists, psychologists and many other types of doctors.

Falls from a scaffold can cause broken arms which usually have to be set and placed in a cast. It takes months before broken bones heal. Other types of injuries include internal organ damage, muscle and ligament damages, severe cuts and lacerations.

OSHA scaffolding statistics

According to the Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) nearly 2/3rds of workers who work in the construction industry work on scaffolding. That percentage translates to about 2.3 million workers. According to the Bureau of Labor, nearly 60 people tragically die from scaffolding falls each year. Nearly 4,500 are injured due to scaffolding each year. One Bureau of Statistics study shows that 72% of scaffolding accidents are due either the “planking or support giving way, or to the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object.”

Types of scaffolding

The two basic types of scaffolds, according to OSHA, are:

  • Suspended scaffolds. Here, at least one platform is suspended by ropes or other types of overhead support that is not rigid.
  • Supported scaffolds. Here, at least one platform is supported by rigid supports such as poles, frames, legs, and outrigger.

Other types of scaffolding that are usually classified as “supported scaffold” are scissor lifts and aerial lifts. Other types of scaffolding, according to OSHA,  include “catenary scaffolds, step and trestle ladder scaffolds, and multi-level suspended scaffold.”

Types of workers who work on scaffolds

There are three types of people who work on scaffolding. These are:

  • The workers who assemble and disassemble the scaffolding. These workers should be trained by someone who can identify predictable hazards and who has the authority to take steps to correct these hazards.
  • Scaffolds should be designed by people with proper degrees, such as engineering degrees, and professional experience. Minimum scaffolding design requirements include understanding:
    • The type of scaffolding necessary for a job
    • The maximum load level
    • How to assure a good foundation
    • How to avoid electrical hazards
    • Users of the scaffolding should be trained on the safety do’s and don’ts.

Employers should review OSHA guidelines or contact OSHA directly before allowing any worker to use the scaffolding.

Common safety tips for workers who use scaffolding

Workers should consult with any manufacturing manuals on proper setup and use before beginning any scaffolding work. Some of the many other practical tips for scaffolding work include:

  • Workers should avoid multitasking. When working on scaffolding, it’s best to work on one task at a time.
  • Workers should walk carefully, testing the stability of the scaffolding every step of the way.
  • Any loose objects or tools not needed for the job should be removed before the scaffolding work starts
  • The entire length of the scaffolding should be inspected
  • A key consideration is the weather. Construction companies and contractors should avoid having their workers work on scaffolding if the weather is rainy, it’s snowing, or if it’s too hot. Wind is an especially dangerous problem. Heavy winds are an extremely dangerous. Generally, the manufacturer and OSHA have strict guidelines that require that workers not be on scaffolding when the wind reaches a high level.
  • Fall protection devices should be set up around the scaffolding.  Fall protection includes wearing helmets and setting up padding or other materials to help cushion any fall. Workers should wear harnesses.
  • Proper storage of scaffolding as it’s being torn down or constructed is also important. Heavy scaffolding that is stored incorrectly can fall on workers and cause serious injury.

Workers compensation benefits for workers injured or killed due to scaffolding accidents

There are different types of benefits available depending on the severity of the injuries.

In death cases, the employer’s insurance company should pay up to $10,000 for the funeral and burial expenses. The dependent family members (generally the spouse and minor children) can claim two-thirds (2/3rds) of the worker’s average weekly wages for a maximum of 500 weeks. In a case of North Carolina death benefits,  minor children may be entitled for more than 500 weeks – up to the time they turn 18 years of age. Also in North Carolina, if the widow or widower of the deceased is disabled, she/he is entitled to benefits for the rest of their life or until they remarry.

When workers survive the fall, they are entitled to have all their medical expenses paid that are necessary to their recovery – for the rest of their lives.

Employees are also generally entitled to 2/3rds of their average weekly wages up until the time they return to work or up to 500 weeks. Workers with a total and permanent disability receive the 2/3rds average weekly wage for the rest of their lives.  If the worker has a permanent partial impairment in relation to a compensable, ratable body part, then an additional analysis is made to determine the length of the 2/3rds average weekly wage benefits.

Additional adjustments and conditions may apply depending on whether your claim is in North Carolina or in Virginia.

At the Virginia Law office and North Carolina office of attorney Joe Miller Esq., we’ve helped thousands of workers including numerous construction workers get the full workers’ compensation benefits they deserve. There is no need to prove fault in North Carolina or Virginia workers’ compensation cases. To speak with an attorney experienced at fighting the insurance companies for employers, call lawyer Joe Miller at 1-(888) 667-8295 or complete my contact form to make an appointment.