What are Permanent Partial Benefits and Permanent and Total Disability Benefits in Virginia

Posted on Monday, June 6th, 2016 at 2:00 pm    

Injured or ill workers may be entitled to additional benefits if their injury or partially or total permanent.

Permanent Partial Impairment (PPI) Benefits. “Separate benefits are payable for the permanent loss of use of a body part such as an arm, leg, finger, or eye. Vision and hearing loss, as well as disfigurement may also be compensated. This does not include the back, neck or body as a whole. Benefits are for a specific number of weeks depending on the percentage of loss. The employee can receive these benefits while working if maximum medical improvement has been reached.” These impairments are called ratings and are expressed as a percentage of impairment. To learn more about ratings, WATCH THIS VIDEO.

Permanent and Total Disability. “Lifetime wage benefits may be payable if an individual loses both hands, arms, feet, legs, eyes, or any two in the same accident, or is paralyzed or disabled from a severe brain injury.” If you have received an injury to two ratable body parts and these injuries interfere with your ability to work, you may be looking at permanent and total disability benefits. If this is you, then you may have a much more significant case than you realize, because you may be entitled to LIFETIME workers comp checks. This is not something that the insurance company is going to volunteer to you.

Get help now for your Virginia workers’ compensation case.

If you were hurt at work, you need someone who will fight for you. The insurance carrier for the employer will fight to deny your claim or minimize your benefits. Virginia workers’ compensation attorney Joe Miller anticipates many of the arguments defense lawyers and insurance companies make. He fights hard to make sure your disability is properly categorized. You may have a significant recovery coming your way. Phone attorney Joe Miller at 888-694-1671 to discuss your claim or complete his online contact form.